WHAT IS THE ROLE OF PEER-REVIEWED PUBLICATIONS IN COMMUNICATING CLINICAL DATA TO HEALTH-CARE PROFESSIONALS?

Objective: To understand the role of peer-reviewed publications in communicating clinical data to health-care professionals (HCPs). Challenge/problem: Peer-reviewed publications are seen as the “gold standard” for sharing clinical trial data, but do we fully understand how HCPs use them? Solution: Two anonymous surveys assessed the extent to which HCPs access, interact with, and use clinical data published in peer-reviewed journals. A pilot survey was sent to 51 HCPs actively involved in publication development, followed by a more comprehensive survey distributed to primary care physicians (n=50) and oncologists (n=50) from the USA (n=25 for each specialty) and all EU5 countries (n=5 per country for each specialty). Outcome: 21 respondents completed the pilot survey. All respondents reported reading peer-reviewed articles on either a monthly (5%), weekly (50%), or daily (45%) basis, with the abstract being the most frequently read section (75%). All respondents read original research and review articles published in journals linked to their specialty, while only 50% read general medical journals; 70% indicated that paywalls had prevented them reading articles. Notably, 90% of respondents indicated that the information they read informed their clinical decision-making. Further results will be presented examining how HCPs access clinical data and use peer-reviewed publications; how communicating clinical data can be improved; and how this differs according to involvement in developing publications, region, and specialty. Benefits: This research will help to improve the way clinical data are communicated to HCPs, ensuring timely and effective sharing of information that will ultimately improve patient care

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